Truck driver sentenced in CDL testing fraud scheme

Aziz Akhrorov recruited New York-based CDL applicants to fraudulently obtain learners’ permits and photo IDs in Florida.

Truck driver sentenced in CDL testing fraud scheme

Aziz Akhrorov recruited New York-based CDL applicants to fraudulently obtain learners’ permits and photo IDs in Florida.

Truck driver sentenced in CDL testing fraud scheme

Aziz Akhrorov recruited New York-based CDL applicants to fraudulently obtain learners’ permits and photo IDs in Florida.

 
   A Queens, N.Y.-based truck driver was sentenced Dec. 4 for his role in a commercial driver’s license testing fraud scheme.
    Aziz Akhrorov was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, N.Y., to time served, a $1,000 fine and a $100 special court assessment.
    Akhrorov pleaded guilty in May to conspiring to unlawfully produce CDLs. DOT regulations require states to test the knowledge and skills of all CDL applicants. From approximately April 2014 to around December 2016, Akhrorov and Taras Chabanovych, a Florida-based co-conspirator, undermined the CDL testing procedures at the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation Office of Inspector General (DOT OIG).   
   Akhrorov recruited New York-based CDL applicants, most of whom were of Russian descent, and referred them to Chabanovych. DOT OIG said that for as much as $2,600 per referral, Chabanovych helped the CDL applicants fraudulently obtain documentation establishing bogus Florida residency, which allowed them to sit for the exam. He also provided sophisticated video and audio devices, which were concealed on the applicants and transmitted the CDL test to him offsite. Then, through an earpiece, Chabanovych gave the applicants the correct answers.
    Due to this cheating scheme, Florida CDL learners’ permits and photo IDs were issued to the applicants, who later exchanged them for New York CDLs, DOT OIG said.
    Chabanovych pleaded guilty and was sentenced in October.
The fear of U.S. tariffs pushed short-term demand and air freight rates in the transpacific this peak season, but rates have also been remarkably strong in the transatlantic and Europe-to-Asia routes this year.
All trucks serving the Northwest Seaport Alliance’s international container terminals now must have a 2007 or newer engine or certified equivalent emission control system.
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