State debars Arms Export Control Act violators

The federal agency announces the names of 23 individuals and entities banned from exporting defense articles that require a State Department license.

State debars Arms Export Control Act violators

The federal agency announces the names of 23 individuals and entities banned from exporting defense articles that require a State Department license.

State debars Arms Export Control Act violators

The federal agency announces the names of 23 individuals and entities banned from exporting defense articles that require a State Department license.

 

   The State Department on Thursday released the names of 23 individuals and entities that are under statutory debarment after being convicted of violating or conspiring to violate the Arms Export Control Act (AECA).
    The debarments take effect Thursday.
    The International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) require anyone who has knowledge that another person is subject to debarment to refrain from participating directly or indirectly in any ITAR-controlled transaction in which the ineligible person might benefit or have a direct or indirect interest therein, unless State’s Directorate of Defense Trade Controls provides written approval.
    State said its general policy is for debarment to last “for a three-year period following conviction.” But debarred persons and entities may apply for reinstatement of export privileges starting one year after the date of debarment.

   In all cases, debarred persons and entities must submit a request to and be approved by State for reinstatement of export privileges before engaging in any defense exports requiring State licenses.
    The ITAR provides for statutory debarment of any person convicted of violating or conspiring to violate the AECA.
    “This notice is provided for purposes of making the public aware that the persons listed above are prohibited from participating directly or indirectly in activities regulated by the ITAR, including any brokering activities and any export from or temporary import into the United States of defense articles, technical data or defense services in all situations covered by the ITAR,” State said.

We thought our numbers would go down because of the trade war. It could still happen, but it hasn’t so far.

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State debars Arms Export Control Act violators

The federal agency announces the names of 23 individuals and entities banned from exporting defense articles that require a State Department license.

Jun 06, 2019 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com

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State debars Arms Export Control Act violators

The federal agency announces the names of 23 individuals and entities banned from exporting defense articles that require a State Department license.

Jun 06, 2019 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com