ILA locals overwhelmingly approve contract extension

Union says the deal will “bring generous pay increases, landmark protections against job-killing fully automated ports and labor peace and stability.”

ILA locals overwhelmingly approve contract extension

Union says the deal will “bring generous pay increases, landmark protections against job-killing fully automated ports and labor peace and stability.”

ILA locals overwhelmingly approve contract extension

Union says the deal will “bring generous pay increases, landmark protections against job-killing fully automated ports and labor peace and stability.”

 
The International Longshoremen’s Association said that members at ports from Maine to Texas on Thursday overwhelmingly approved a six-year extension of its contract with the United States Maritime Alliance (USMX).
    The union said the deal will bring generous pay increases, landmark protections against job-killing fully automated ports and labor peace and stability through September 30, 2024.
    ILA President Harold J. Daggett, the union’s chief negotiator who termed this agreement the best contract he ever witnessed in his 50-plus-year ILA career, applauded the successful ratification vote.
    As of 10 p.m. Thursday, every ILA local reporting results to the ILA offices in North Bergen, N.J., approved the master contract, with unanimous approval likely of all ILA locals.
    “ILA members covered under this ILA-USMX master agreement can now look to a bright future where their salaries will increase and the threat of job loss from fully automated terminals, semiautomated terminals and automated equipment is eliminated, Daggett said.
   The current ILA master contract was set to expire at the end of September.

We are seeing many more pricing requests for Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent. Few actually moved their supply chains outside of China because this will take time, especially for larger shippers. However, Taiwan and South Korea are in a unique situation: Some manufacturing had shifted to mainland China in the last decade due to lower costs, but that infrastructure is still in Taiwan and South Korea. Some manufacturing may temporarily shift back there until Southeast Asia infrastructure catches up. 

The Port of Zeebrugge is called by 12 liner services that also sail to regions outside North Europe, according to BlueWater Reporting’s Port Dashboard tool.

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ILA locals overwhelmingly approve contract extension

Union says the deal will “bring generous pay increases, landmark protections against job-killing fully automated ports and labor peace and stability.”

Sep 07, 2018 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com

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ILA locals overwhelmingly approve contract extension

Union says the deal will “bring generous pay increases, landmark protections against job-killing fully automated ports and labor peace and stability.”

Sep 07, 2018 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com