End to AD suspension on Mexican tomatoes in sight

Commerce provided notice to Mexican signatories on Wednesday, after industry and lawmakers pushed for a pullout of the 2013 agreement.

End to AD suspension on Mexican tomatoes in sight

Commerce provided notice to Mexican signatories on Wednesday, after industry and lawmakers pushed for a pullout of the 2013 agreement.

End to AD suspension on Mexican tomatoes in sight

Commerce provided notice to Mexican signatories on Wednesday, after industry and lawmakers pushed for a pullout of the 2013 agreement.

 
The Commerce Department on Wednesday notified Mexico of the United States’ intent to withdraw from the 2013 antidumping duty suspension agreement on fresh tomatoes from Mexico, effective May 7, Commerce announced Thursday.
    The agreement allows the signatories to the agreement to withdraw 90 days after providing written notice to the other party.
    The notice comes after the Florida Tomato Exchange in November requested Commerce end the agreement and resume the AD investigation of fresh tomatoes from Mexico and after 48 congressional lawmakers in a Feb. 1 letter urged Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to terminate the agreement, noting that Mexican exporters have continued to engage in unfair trade practices to gain U.S. market share.
    “We have heard the concerns of the American tomato producing industry and are taking action today to ensure they are protected from unfair trading practices,” Ross said in a statement. “The Trump administration will continue to use every tool in our toolbox to ensure trade is free, fair and reciprocal.”
    Commerce will continue with its AD investigation upon termination of the agreement and notify the International Trade Commission of its final determination, Commerce said. The ITC will then conduct its own investigation and make a final injury determination. An AD order will be issued if both Commerce and the ITC issue affirmative final determinations.
   Despite “committed efforts” by all sides after negotiations opened with Mexican signatories in January 2018, significant issues remained regarding the crafting of a revised agreement that would be acceptable to the Mexican signatories and address the concerns of the U.S. domestic industry to the extent possible under U.S. trade law, Commerce said.

The strategy of only relying on unilateral pressure is causing a lot of collateral damage in the United States and elsewhere. We should stop bashing our allies, threatening tariffs with them [and] collaborate with them.

Drewry’s World Container Index, a composite of container freight rates on eight major routes to and from the U.S., Europe and Asia, was down 1.4% to $1,351.15 per 40-foot container as of June 13.

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End to AD suspension on Mexican tomatoes in sight

Commerce provided notice to Mexican signatories on Wednesday, after industry and lawmakers pushed for a pullout of the 2013 agreement.

Feb 08, 2019 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com

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End to AD suspension on Mexican tomatoes in sight

Commerce provided notice to Mexican signatories on Wednesday, after industry and lawmakers pushed for a pullout of the 2013 agreement.

Feb 08, 2019 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com