Commerce sets final duty rates in aluminum case

The next phase of the investigation is for the ITC to make its determination on whether imports of common alloy aluminum sheet from China injure U.S. industry.

Commerce sets final duty rates in aluminum case

The next phase of the investigation is for the ITC to make its determination on whether imports of common alloy aluminum sheet from China injure U.S. industry.

Commerce sets final duty rates in aluminum case

The next phase of the investigation is for the ITC to make its determination on whether imports of common alloy aluminum sheet from China injure U.S. industry.

 
The Commerce Department has reached affirmative final antidumping and countervailing duty determinations on common alloy aluminum sheet from China, in the first AD/CV cases self-initiated by the U.S. government since 1985, Commerce announced Wednesday.
    In its AD determination, Commerce found that Chinese exporters have sold common alloy aluminum sheet to the U.S. at rates ranging from 49.85 percent to 59.72 percent less than fair value, while Commerce’s CV determination indicates that China provided countervailable subsidies to producers at rates ranging from 46.48 percent to 116.49 percent, Commerce said.
    In April, Commerce preliminarily had set CV rates of 31.2 percent to 113.3 percent and in August, assigned a preliminary AD rate of 91.47 percent.
    The period of investigation for the CV case is the full year of 2016, and the period of investigation for the AD case is April 1 to Sept. 30, 2017.
    The International Trade Commission (ITC) is scheduled to make final injury determinations on imports of common alloy aluminum sheet on Dec. 20.
   Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect AD cash deposits equal to the applicable final dumping rates, and deposits won’t be required with regard to the CV duty investigation unless the ITC makes an affirmative injury determination for that case, Commerce said in a fact sheet.
    Imports of common alloy aluminum sheet from China in 2017 totaled an estimated $900 million, Commerce said.
    If the ITC makes affirmative final injury determinations, Commerce will issue AD and CV duty orders. If the ITC finds that imports don’t materially injure U.S. industry, investigations will be terminated and no orders will be issued.
    The ITC on Oct. 31 held a hearing during which various witnesses made arguments for and against AD and CV duties on common alloy aluminum sheet from China.
    The Commerce Department self-initiated the cases in November 2017.
   “President Trump has been clear in the need for drastic action to defend American workers and businesses from unfair trade practices,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in a statement. “The Department of Commerce has answered this call. We will continue to do everything in our power under U.S. law to restrict the flow of dumped or subsidized goods into U.S. markets.”
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