CBP to make import data access easier for ACE users

Customs and Border Protection will begin migrating its Importer Trade Activity data to ACE Reports, making the data available to all trade members on demand. 

CBP to make import data access easier for ACE users

Customs and Border Protection will begin migrating its Importer Trade Activity data to ACE Reports, making the data available to all trade members on demand. 

CBP to make import data access easier for ACE users

Customs and Border Protection will begin migrating its Importer Trade Activity data to ACE Reports, making the data available to all trade members on demand. 

 

   U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Office of Trade has launched an initiative to make timely trade data more readily available to users of its Automated Commercial Environment (ACE).
    Starting this spring, CBP will begin migrating its Importer Trade Activity (ITRAC) data to ACE Reports, making the data available to all trade members on demand.
    During this time, industry may continue to use existing processes to request ITRAC reports from the agency via CDs and quarterly uploads via the Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (CTPAT) portal (Importer Self-Assessment participants).
    “This will allow CBP time to migrate all ITRAC data through the course of the summer and provide trade with time to familiarize with running ITRAC reports in ACE, while continuing to provide access to existing ITRAC reporting processes,” the agency said in an email message to the trade on Wednesday.

   “At the end of the full transition to ACE, existing ITRAC reporting processes will be retired and replaced with quicker, more streamlined access to the data,” CBP added.
    Other components of the initiative will include enhancing ACE Reports processing speeds and data-retrieval capabilities and providing new data types in ACE Reports.
    Questions about this ACE Reports initiative may be emailed to ace.reports@cbp.dhs.gov.

We are seeing many more pricing requests for Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent. Few actually moved their supply chains outside of China because this will take time, especially for larger shippers. However, Taiwan and South Korea are in a unique situation: Some manufacturing had shifted to mainland China in the last decade due to lower costs, but that infrastructure is still in Taiwan and South Korea. Some manufacturing may temporarily shift back there until Southeast Asia infrastructure catches up. 

Iron ore shipments from U.S. Great Lakes ports totaled 6 million tons in May, up 2% year-over-year, according to the Lake Carriers’ Association.

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CBP to make import data access easier for ACE users

Customs and Border Protection will begin migrating its Importer Trade Activity data to ACE Reports, making the data available to all trade members on demand. 

Apr 18, 2019 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com

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CBP to make import data access easier for ACE users

Customs and Border Protection will begin migrating its Importer Trade Activity data to ACE Reports, making the data available to all trade members on demand. 

Apr 18, 2019 on Dec 27, 2018AmericanShipper.com