Oakland volumes grow 4% in April

The Port of Oakland says the trend towards bigger containerships means that even though fewer vessels are calling the port, volumes are increasing, diesel emissions are down, and berths are less congested.

Oakland volumes grow 4% in April

The Port of Oakland says the trend towards bigger containerships means that even though fewer vessels are calling the port, volumes are increasing, diesel emissions are down, and berths are less congested.

Oakland volumes grow 4% in April

The Port of Oakland says the trend towards bigger containerships means that even though fewer vessels are calling the port, volumes are increasing, diesel emissions are down, and berths are less congested.

 
Source: Nature Art / Shutterstock.com Container volumes at the Port of Oakland rose 4 percent year-over-year to 196,247 TEUs in April 2017.
    The Port of Oakland handled 196,247 TEUs of containerized cargo in April 2017, 4 percent more than in the same 2016 period, according to the most recent figures from the port.
    The Northern California port says the trend towards bigger containerships means that even though fewer vessels are calling the port, volumes are increasing, diesel emissions are down and berths are less congested.
    Last month's total included 74,957 TEUs of full inbound containers, 77,798 TEUs of full outbound containers, 16,346 TEUs of empty inbound containers, and 27,146 TEUs of empty outbound containers.
    In the first four months of 2017, container volumes are up 2.8 percent year-over-year to 767,455 TEUs, even though the number of vessels arriving in the port has fallen 5.6 percent to 539 during the same timeframe.
   “Shipping lines have moved to larger vessels to consolidate cargo and cut costs,” explained Port of Oakland Maritime Director John Driscoll. “We’re the beneficiaries because we can handle volume growth efficiently and sustainably.”
    The port said the average size for vessels visiting Oakland is more than 8,000 TEUs, whereas the average was closer to 5,000 TEUs just three years ago. Ships with capacity for 14,000 TEUs – the largest calling North American ports – now call Oakland on a weekly basis, the port said.
Truckers need more safe places to park, not more studies that do nothing to increase or preserve capacity. This is a critical highway safety issue that deserves dedicated federal funding.
FTR reports preliminary North American Class 8 orders for January dropped 26 percent month-over-month to 15,600 units, the lowest since October 2016.
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Oakland volumes grow 4% in April

The Port of Oakland says the trend towards bigger containerships means that even though fewer vessels are calling the port, volumes are increasing, diesel emissions are down, and berths are less congested.

By Chris Dupin on May 12, 2017AmericanShipper.com

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Oakland volumes grow 4% in April

The Port of Oakland says the trend towards bigger containerships means that even though fewer vessels are calling the port, volumes are increasing, diesel emissions are down, and berths are less congested.

By Chris Dupin on May 12, 2017AmericanShipper.com